Dangerous business

“It’s a dangerous business, going out of your door. You step into the Road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there is no knowing where you might be swept off to.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

… And an even more intrepid soul who steps forth into her garden. One curious look and an afternoon is swallowed up, leaving her bitten and sodden in satisfaction… and forgetting why she went out there in the first place, loosing cups of tea and broken thoughts in the cuttings.

Ahimsa and Permaculture

In an interview with Scott London Bill Mollison explains the history and motivation for Permaculture. One pertinent remark he made was :

‘It’s curious that we never apply what we know to how we actually live’.

Why does a plumber spend his life making beautiful bathrooms for his customers and is unable to come home and fix his own? I believe fundamentally this boils down to self worth. Particularly now, where we live in such isolated environments, the notion of doing something for the community at large is quite removed, or is perhaps restricted to working hours. This gives us the opportunity to practice a reversal of sorts – treat your neighbour as you would yourself – now I believe it is time to treat yourself as you treat your neighbour (that is if you have mastered the first act of true respect and love for your neighbour).

It is more than just laziness that keeps us from living out our wisdom. Every instruction manual and every tip is now available on the Web – it doesn’t mean for certain that you will google it and apply it to your life. What does determine action – is your state of mind and it stems from your love of self – not in a conceited manner – but through a deep acceptance, which is the first practice in yoga of Ahimsa or non-harm.

Scott London’s Interview with Bill Mollison

Permaculture and Spirit

Recently I came across the DVD “Reconnecting to Nature though Spiritual Permaculture”. It documents a conference in Hawaii whose guest speaker was Dr Leonid Sharashkin, translator of Anastasia which I had read a couple of years ago. The DVD has been playing on my mind after watching it.
It asks us to re-introduce consciousness into design and suggests that design is nothing more than an expression of the conscious state we are in at any given moment. Gardening for food is advocated as much more than a practical solution – it is a Spiritual practice of healing both our selves and our environment.This is particularly pertinent as the garden for “Permaculture in Suburbia” is within the setting of a Yoga School. This weekend I was working on the Spiral Meditation Garden. I have planted the two new grafted apples from Toora Heritage Pear Farm Grafting Day – given that there has been soo much rain I was drawn to planting and transplanting in the moments when the sun did come out.

The Spiral seems to have a life of its own and I have enjoyed the experience of stepping back and allowing it to take form around me. I was looking today at the Roses which we had transplanted last winter into this site which has now become the Spiral. The move of the roses was made out of necessity – there was not enough rain and we wanted to dedicate the front garden beds to food production as they receive the most water. The roses were given strict instruction – you’ve just got to make good of what you got – they were not watered particularly much but have thrived and now make a gorgeous setting for the meditation spiral walk. What I enjoyed as I looked at them today was the sense of having not planned – but ended up with exactly what I would have wanted!

Grace.